From Blog Posts

Our Common Fire

Life is difficult. This is true for everyone. Always. Beautiful people suffer inner torments. We tend not to allow for this because we compare our insides with other peoples’ outsides. But every so often a story breaks about suicide or hidden illness and we realize that realize that suffering is universal. And yet this is…

Zoltan Tasi, "Penshurst Place & Gardens," Penshurst, United Kingdom via Unsplash

The Power that Reveals

Now seems a good time to gently remind people that presence can be a refuge and resource. On paper, it may not seem like much. The Oxford dictionary defines presence as “the state or fact of existing, occurring or being present.” This seems so rudimentary, just bare existence, as if you are showing up at…

Peter Oslanec on Unsplash @peter_oslanec

On Being Lost

“In the middle of the journey of our life I found myself in a dark wood where the straight way was lost.” I for one know how this feels. Once in the vast Yosemite National Forest in the Sierra Nevada Mountains in California, I lost my way. And I was not alone but supposedly taking…

Photograph by Aperture Village on Unsplash

Being Like Trees

In challenging times, we humans tend to fall back on our earliest and deepest understandings. We fall back on our earliest way of relating to the world, which is not in words, but through the body. We don’t usually think of the body as comprehending the ways of the universe. But the body knows things.…

Alphonse Osbert (1857-1939), "Silence of the Water," 1895

Letting it Be and Being Kind

When I find myself in times of trouble, Mother Mary comes to me. Speaking words of wisdom, let it be. And in my hour of darkness she is standing right in front of me. Speaking words of wisdom, let it be. Paul McCartney wrote this famous song about his own mother Mary, who died when…

Tara Protecting from the Eight Fears, Kham Province, Eastern Tibet; 19th century Pigments on cloth, Rubin Museum of Art, Gift of Shelley & Donald Rubin Foundation, F1997.15.1 (HAR 237).

Light in the Bardo

I would have died if I hadn’t died. This sentence has been as consoling and informing to me as whole spiritual books and courses. For a long time I attributed it to the Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard. Yet so far Internet searches have turned up nothing. I can almost remember hearing it in a class…